Hello! My blog is mostly animals and just stuff that I like. I do post dead things, but it's all tagged. Thanks for visiting, and feel free to talk to me!

art blog [x]


in the skulk

above art by {x} theme by {x}

Feline
Vulpine

howtoskinatiger:

Horned Desert Viper by Chris! Würbel on Flickr.

Posted 1 hour ago with 155 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #snake
Posted 1 hour ago with 155 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #snake

1msg:

Oliver

Posted 1 hour ago with 8960 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #cat
Posted 1 hour ago with 8960 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #cat

crispysnakes:

fuckyeahretics:

Dark aberrant patterned WC male Reticulated Python from Filaretic.

Wow that thing is neat looking!

Posted 2 hours ago with 101 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #snake
Posted 2 hours ago with 101 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #snake

simply-canine:

brindle basenji (by Claudia Nix)

Posted 2 hours ago with 11 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #dog
Posted 2 hours ago with 11 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #dog

howtoskinatiger:

dead twins by Łukaszenko on Flickr.

elegantwolves:

by francescrossley

Posted 3 hours ago with 226 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #wolf
Posted 3 hours ago with 226 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #wolf

photogenicfelines:

(Ruslan)

Posted 6 hours ago with 648 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #cat
Posted 6 hours ago with 648 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #cat
Posted 7 hours ago with 9526 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #cat
Posted 7 hours ago with 9526 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #cat

beautyrendezvous:

Jaguar - Belize (by Gerry Ellis)

Posted 7 hours ago with 801 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #jaguar
Posted 7 hours ago with 801 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #jaguar

llbwwb:

Playing young snow leopards (by Tambako the Jaguar)

Posted 7 hours ago with 121 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #leopard
Posted 7 hours ago with 121 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #leopard

shadesofamethyst:

lickystickypickyshe:

The Turkish company Pugedon has recently introduced a vending machine that’s an innovative way to help both the environment and our furry friends. It releases food for the city’s stray dogs and cats every time a plastic bottle is deposited, and it allows people to empty their water bottles for the animals as well.

This wonderful service operates at no charge to the city because the recycled plastic pays for the cost of food. So, with a little financial investment, the simple machines do a lot of good. They provide a steady source of sustenance to the animals, many of which rely on caring residents to regularly feed them. It also encourages people to make a habit of recycling and help conserve our environment for future generations.

Put these everywhere

Posted 8 hours ago with 38379 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #dog #cat
Posted 8 hours ago with 38379 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #dog #cat

verybluebirdy:

ifonlyyoucouldseeit:

This is Harley. He is a young buck. He likes to hang out under the bushes by my house. He lets me sit and read with him. Sometimes I feed him apples.

oh no. oh no oh no. i literally just said ‘oh no ’ out loud. i cannot handle this dear face. these sweet eyes. hiding behind a simple l eaf. i cannot do this. deer you have ru ine d me.

griseus:

USING LIVING FISH TO STUDY ANCIENT EVOLUTIONARY CHANGES: How plasticity works in evolution race

Ambitious experimental and morphological studies of a modern fish show how developmental flexibility may have helped early ‘fishapods’ to make the transition from finned aquatic animals to tetrapods that walk on land.

The origin of tetrapods from their fish antecedents, approximately 400 million years ago, was coupled with the origin of terrestrial locomotion and the evolution of supporting limbs. Polypterus is a ray-finned fish (actinopterygians) and is pretty similar to elpistostegid fishes, which are stem tetrapods. Polypterus therefore serves as an extant analogue of stem tetrapods, allowing us to examine how developmental plasticity affects the ‘terrestrialization’ of fish. How else would you find out what behavioral and physiological changes might have taken place when fish first made the move from sea to land over 400 million years ago? putting a fish walking on land.
To find out exactly what might have happened when aquatic animals first moved to land, Researchers took 111 juvenile Polypterus senegalus a fish species that goes by the common name Senegal bichir, or “dinosaur eel" — and raised them for eight months in a terrestrial environment. This environment consisted of mesh flooring covered in pebbles and just 3 millimeters of water — a precaution that, combined with water misters, prevented the fish from drying out. The researchers also formed a control group using 38 fish growing up in their usual aquatic environment.

Dinosaur eels also have gills, but they breathe at the surface regularly to increase their oxygen supply. They also occasionally use their fins to walk on land. Results raise the possibility that environmentally induced developmental plasticity facilitated the origin of the terrestrial traits that led to tetrapods.

elegantwolves:

by glidergoth

Posted 8 hours ago with 1152 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #wolf
Posted 8 hours ago with 1152 notes - via - source
Filed Under: #wolf